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William Moulton Marston – The DISC profile inventor

September 28, 2011

Anyone who seriously concerns about DISC (https://robin0479.wordpress.com/2011/09/25/disc-profiling/) must know about this name : William Moulton Marston, The man behind this theory.

William Moulton Marston’s life story is an interesting one—filled with accomplishments which at first seem totally unrelated. He was a lawyer, a psychologist, invented the first functional lie detector polygraph, created the DISC model for emotions and behavior of normal people, authored self-help books, a feminist theorist and created the Wonder Woman comic.

Dr. William Moulton Marston (May 9, 1893 – May 2, 1947), also known by the pen name Charles Moulton.  He lived with Two women, his wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston and Olive Byrne who lived with the couple in a polyamorous relationship * (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Moulton_Marston).

* Polyamory is a less specific term than polygamy, the practice or condition of having more than one spouse. (Most polygamous cultures are traditionally polygynous, where one husband has multiple wives. Polyandrous societies, in which one wife has multiple husbands, are less common but do exist.[1]) Marriage is not a requirement in polyamory (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyamory)

Maybe the following words would explain about the feminist theorist he became : He regarded women as being more honest and reliable than men, not to mention less angry and violent. Marston viewed matriarchal societies as the ideal since women could curb male anarchy through their sexuality.

But his views on women were reinforced by his unusual private life. While still married to Elizabeth, he became involved with Olive Byrnes, a former student who became his assistant. With his wife’s blessing, Olive moved in with them in a remarkable menage-a-trois relationship that lasted until his death in 1947. Even after Marston died, Elizabeth and Olive continued to live together with their children (two by each woman) until Olive’s death in the 1980s.

Regarding his feminine theory that sounds so acceptable in women ears, He might know for sure that women are so many affected by words,not action. Therefore, to make them accept what he “really” wanted, He made a theory about women to sound like he’s on women’s side but his private life with women was still the contrary of his theory.

You can check “Our Women Are Our Future,” a 1942 interview with Marston published in Family Circle.

A wonder woman comic strip created by William Moulton Marston.

The Lie Detector – Marston’s Earliest Professional Years

Having discovered a correspondence between blood pressure and lying, he built a device to measure changes in a person’s blood pressure while the subject was being questioned. Marston formally published his early polygraph findings in 1917 on the lie detection invention he first constructed in 1915.

During the 1920s and 30s Marston was an active lecturer and consulted with government groups. Unlike many psychologists of the time, he was more interested in the behavior of the general population of people rather than abnormal psychology.

He gained the attention of the federal government for his research. He also sought the attention of the courts and the public by publishing widely and seeking publicity. Following the Lindbergh kidnapping in the 1930s, Marston offered his services to the Lindbergh family.

In November 1920, a prominent Washington, D.C. physician was shot to death in a robbery. After months of investigation, police arrested James Frye who eventually confessed to the crime. Frye later recanted this confession before his trial was set to begin claiming that he had been promised money to admit to the crime. At the request of Frye’s attorney, psychologist William Moulton Marston was called in to verify that Frye was telling the truth. Having made a name for himself through the use of systolic blood pressure testing to detect lying (he actually coined the term “lie detector”), Marston tested Frye in a D.C. jail and concluded that he was telling the truth.

 

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From → Famous figures

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