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Sarcasm attitude : How you define it

July 13, 2012

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Below was summarized from my googling search to define how netters classify sarcasm in term of attitude. Hope this pretty useful for anyone who thinks upfronting is the only negativity so they use another form to spread the negativity?

Sarcasm is for cowards. The touch of humor in sarcastic comments can hide criticisms far too aggressive to be spoken plainly.  If you can’t bring yourself to directly say what you really mean, you shouldn’t say it at all.

Attitude is like food; it comes in all different kinds. Like fruits and vegetables, some kinds of attitude are good for you. Like double-deep-fried peanut butter-filled Twinkies, some are bad for you. For the most part, you can label attitudes as “positive” and “negative.”

One example of a positive attitude is cheerfulness, being in a good mood and pleasant to be around. Another is optimism, which is looking for the good side in situations and people. Positive attitudes are valuable gifts that can improve your life and the lives of those around you. But like some valuable gifts, they can be hard to find. Honestly, I’m baffled by how some people can be so optimistic! Do you have to watch Pollyanna 10 times in a row before becoming an optimistic person?

Negative attitudes hurt you and and the people in your life. Sarcasm is a type of negative attitude where you use mocking language to hurt someone. Pessimism is the opposite of optimism, so you’re expecting the worst in people and situations. And you know what can really leave a bitter taste in your mouth? Bitterness! That’s a type of anger or resentment toward something that happened to you (or you think happened to you).

Here are ten reasons for you to put the sarcasm aside.

  1. First, the practical:  sarcasm is ambiguous. A sarcastic message depends heavily on tone of voice, body language and other nonverbal cues to be properly understood.  The true meaning of a sarcastic message is easily lost over the phone–and you can forget about sarcastic comments being properly understood in written communication.  Sarcasm often goes unnoticed without the change in inflection or raised eyebrow to signal its presence.  And if you miss those cues, sarcastic remarks don’t make any sense.
  2. Sarcasm translates poorly. E SL teachers are taught to never use sarcasm:  it’s just not understood by their students.
  3. Sarcasm is a defense mechanism. It’s not a very good one, because of the inherent negative nature of sarcasm.  If you need a positive defense mechanism, make it laughter.  (Just make sure it’s friendly laughter.)
  4. Sarcasm is cynical. Do you want to be known as a person who is “scornfully and habitually negative”?  That’s the dictionary definition of a cynic.  Sarcasm is both a product and reinforcer of negative thinking.  Find some happier thoughts.  Don’t wallow in negativity.
  5. Sarcasm is negative by its very nature. There’s a reason the saying goes “accentuate the positive.”  Nothing good comes from sarcasm.
  6. Sarcasm is mean and can be used as a veil for truly hurtful criticism.  The element of humor takes the edge off a bit, but it’s still mean.  Don’t be a bully; drop the sarcasm.
  7. Sarcasm is for cowards. The touch of humor in sarcastic comments can hide criticisms far too aggressive to be spoken plainly.  If you can’t bring yourself to directly say what you really mean, you shouldn’t say it at all.
  8. Sarcasm is the lowest form of wit, says Oscar Wilde.  It’s not funny; it doesn’t make you seem witty.  Take Emily Post’s advice instead:  “As a possession for either man or woman, a ready smile is more valuable in life than a ready wit.”
  9. Sarcasm is a means of judging others. Do you really need to belittle others to make yourself look better?  Don’t be the jerk with the superiority complex.  Use kind words instead.
  10. Sarcasm wastes words that could be put to better use. Kind words are the best thing we can give another person.  Sarcasm trades kindness for cruelty.  It serves no higher purpose; it builds no one up.  Silence is far preferable to sarcasm, but kind words are better still.

References :

http://www.ehow.com/info_12142789_deal-sarcastic-coworkers.html

http://modernmrsdarcy.com/2011/03/you-can-kick-the-sarcastic-habit/

http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/view/130479

 

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